Varieties of fish all over

Sat, 09/03/2016 - 7:45am
Category: 

This week’s shore fishing report shows a slow pack of stripers coming up on the east side sand beaches. At the beginning of this week, however, an offshore swell had big waves pounding the east and south sides of the island. Keeper bass have been taken at night on the east beaches just outside the white water. Scup/porgies continue to be the fish du jour in the Coast Guard Channel. We have yet to get any shoreline reports of false albacore or Atlantic bonito pushing through the Coast Guard Channel and into the Great Salt Pond, but that bite could turn at any time. Squid fishing from the docks in the Great Salt Pond remains productive.

The boat fishing has been much more productive, both in tight along the rock piles as well as in the deeper holes. Eeeling remains the go-to tactic to take larger bass on the structure southwest of the island. Bodies of fish have been moving around that area, and, once located, they are willing to eat. Gigantic blues can also be found on the south side in 30 to 40 feet of water. These are 15- to 18-pound fish with shoulders — so bring the right rod and reel setup! Seabass, porgy, and fluke fishing continues to be productive by the Wind Farm. Whether you love or hate these giant pinwheels, they will hold fish year-round. It should only get better year to year. 

Fishworks had the privilege to take Pfc. Sean Pesce of the 2nd Ranger Battalion, and his girlfriend Zuleyma, fishing on Harley. Sean served as an Army Ranger in Afghanistan, where he was shot 13 times during a firefight. The injuries left Sean confined to a wheelchair. Local islander Charlie Weber, a Ranger himself, along with his Ranger brothers, made arrangements to bring Sean out to Block Island for some R&R. We were able to get him fishing on a beautiful Saturday and he enjoyed the day immensely. 

We ask everyone to thank our men and women that serve in the Armed Forces and to support organizations like the Wounded Warrior Project (www.woundedwarriorproject.org), and to take care of our veterans returning home.

Catch ‘em up!